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Learn about wild game wine pairings

Learn about wild game wine pairings

Wild duck, goose, partridge and pheasant meat is very aromatic and is paired with stronger, aromatic wines in comparison with the wines paired with domestic poultry. Wild game wine pairings is not a mystery. Choice of wine depends on the age of the bird and its preparation.

In view of world market demands for healthy, low-calorie, low-cholesterol and low-fat food, game meet has a very good quality but is unfortunately insufficiently consumed in every day life.

This meat is untreated with hormones and steroids, and has a fine texture and delicate taste when prepared properly. The reason is that game feeds on herbs and fresh grass and has unlimited freedom in nature. Thus it would be a real shame not to pair it with wine that complements its high-quality flavor.

Wild poultry and wine

Wild duck, goose, partridge and pheasant meat is very aromatic and is paired with stronger, aromatic wines in comparison with the wines paired with domestic poultry. Choice of wine depends on the age of the bird and its preparation.
Young roasted partridge or a pheasant has a less intense flavor compared to older birds so light red wine such as Shiraz or Chianti would be appropriate. If the meat is prepared with thyme, then a more mature red Burgundy would be more appropriate.

Wild duck and wine

Burgundy wine such as Marsanne is a good choice if roasted duck is served. Raspberry and black cherry aromas of this medium-bodied wine are a perfect mach to the duck.
In case the meat is served with a fruit sauce such as orange or black cherry, wine must be selected based on the sauce. Australian Chardonnay goes well with an orange sauce. Black cherry sauce can be complemented with both red and white wine. In this case, a Riesling of high acidity would be a good choice.

Wild goose and wine

Wild goose meat has an intense flavor and can be matched with just as intense wines. However, just as with any poultry, one must be careful with tannins and select wines that have low levels of tannins.
Roasted goose, as a delicacy not served very often, deserves to be paired with such wines as high quality red Burgundy or mature Bordeaux Claret, which is considered a perfect choice.

Venison and wine

Venison is best paired with Italian wines, Barolo and Barbaresco, made of Italian grape variety Nebbiolo. Nebbiolo is used to make red wines with very intense aromas of truffles, smoke and licorice that make an excellent combination with venison, an aromatic and dry meat.
This meat does not require wines with high level of tannins so good choices can be red Burgundy and Côtes du Rhône. Venison cooked with red wine, onions and herbs is well matched with full-bodied wines such as Coupage Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz or Zinfandel.

Rabbit and wine

Rabbit can be prepared in several ways, which determine what wine to select. If it is baked, a good choice would be a red wine such as mature Beaujolais.
Grilled rabbit requires fruity but not very oaky red wines. Softness and a solid fruit flavor that reminds of plums, roses and black currant of Merlot will mach the recognizable taste of grilled rabbit. In this case, choices are Australian Shiraz, Chilean Cabernet or Vranac.
Rabbit cooked in red wine is paired very well with Cabernet or Coupage Cabernet and Vranac. This would be perfect wild game wine pairings.

Wild bore and wine

Aromas of wild bore meat are a lot stronger compared to domestic pork. This meat matches well with Rhone red (Côtes du Rhône) wine with raspberry and vanilla aromas. One can never go wrong with Brunello with aromas of chestnut, plums and earth as well as Barolo from Italian region Piedmont with aromas of dark fruit, smoke and oak.